FWIS Student Prize Winners


The Program in Writing and Communication is pleased to grant prizes to the most outstanding expository and analytical essays written by and oral presentations given by FWIS students each academic year. Congratulations to our winners!

ACADEMIC YEAR 2017-2018

 
 

Haafiz Hashim, 1st Place, Best Expository and Analytical Essay

"Genetic Engineering: A Catalyst for Social Division"  
FWIS 174: Science Fiction and the Future of Medicine

 
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Nitin Srinivasan, 2nd Place, Best Expository and Analytical Essay

"Fresh Off the Boat: Appearances, Stereotypes, and the Like" read essay
FWIS 112: Modern Families

Nitin Srinivasan is a Hanszen College sophomore from San Jose, California. His participation in performing arts growing up, while also being a member of the South Asian American community, inspired him to write about the effects of the essentialization and stereotyping of Asian Americans and the portrayal of Asian Americans in film, television, and other media. He learned about how the model minority myth overshadows the diversity of experiences that different Asian Americans face, including socioeconomic disadvantages and mental health issues, and he is now dedicated to spreading that message to others.

 
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Hannah George, 3rd Place, Best Expository and Analytical Essay

"The Othering of ‘Queerness’ in Science Fiction"  read essay
FWIS 174: Science Fiction and the Future of Medicine

Hannah George is originally from Aspen, Colorado, though she is now proud to call Wiess College her home. From her first time sitting down to watch the original Star Wars trilogy with her family, Hannah has been a lifelong fan of science fiction and the endless possibilities speculation provides to the imagination. Throughout her study of how hypothetically advanced medicine changes the societies of the future, Hannah was keen to question the roles of gender and sexuality in a genre unrestricted by the confines of reality. 

 

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Serra Sozen, 1st Place, Best Oral Presentation

Human Trafficking in Houston  view presentation
FWIS 164: Ways of Walking

Serra Sozen is a Sid Richardson sophomore who originates from Long Island, New York. Upon moving to Houston last fall and discovering its status as the largest hub for sex trade in the U.S., she was influenced to further investigate the prominence of human trafficking in this diverse and male-dominated city. Her presentation focuses on exposing Houston's abhorrently high involvement in this illegal trade and discusses the prevalence of sex trafficking in our very own neighborhood.

 
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Sabrina Huang, 2nd Place, Best Oral Presentation

The Effects of GMOs on Non-GMO Honey Farmers view presentation
FWIS 146: To Eat or Not to Eat GMOs

Sabrina Huang is currently a Martel sophomore at Rice University majoring in Mathematical Economic Analysis and minoring in Business. She was born in Dallas but moved to Beijing, China, when she was only two years old and attended international school until she graduated from high school. After taking a class on nutrition in her freshman year, she became very interested in learning about what goes into her food, which drew her towards the FWIS about the benefits and costs of GMOs. She found inspiration while preparing for her oral presentation by combining her two interests: GMOs and economics. Thus in her presentation, she discussed the negative externalities of GMOs on nearby honey farmers in the Yucatan Peninsula and how it would affect the honey market.

 
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Kunal Rai, 3rd Place, Best Oral Presentation

Ethics Code Conflicts for Engineers and Architects  view presentation
FWIS 168: Building Design Problems

Kunal Rai, a Jonesian, is originally from Southlake, TX. He is a sophomore studying Electrical Engineering and Business. In his presentation, he examines the ethical and technical codes that structural engineers and architects work with. The focus of the presentation is on the cross section of these codes and how the contradictions and morally ambiguous area between them affect the decision-making process of architects and structural engineers.